My TESOL Schedule

This week I’m heading to Philadelphia for the annual TESOL convention. As in past years, I will try to share some convention highlights here on WordPress. There are usually a few sessions each day that send me to my laptop with excitement, and I’m sure I’ll have plenty to pass along to those who are unable to attend. If any of you will be in Philly as well, please take a look at my schedule. Perhaps our paths will cross.

Wednesday, March 28

11:30 am – 1:30 pm Leadership Luncheon

Thursday, March 29

2 – 3:45 pm Book Publications Committee (BPC) Session: I Want to Write a Book! Getting Published with TESOL  – I will be co-presenting with my fellow BPC committee members.

3 – 5 pm “Meet the Authors” at the Pearson Booth in the Exhibit Hall – I will likely drop by at this event.

Friday, March 30

11 am – 12 pm Materials Writers Interest Section (MWIS) Booth in the Exhibit Hall – I will be volunteering at the booth for one hour. Stop by and say hi!

3 – 5 pm “Meet the Authors” at the Pearson Booth in the Exhibit Hall – I will likely drop by at this event.

Saturday, March 31

1 – 1:45 pm Pearson-sponsored session: Maximizing Dictionary Use for Vocabulary Acquisition – I will be co-presenting with my colleague, Pamela Vittorio.

In addition to the events listed above, I’ll be present at a few evening receptions. I hope to meet both old and new TESOL members!

8 Comments Add yours

  1. Hi Jennifer. Thank you for your inspirational videos and blog posts.

    As a fellow teacher and teacher trainer, the TESOL convention sounds very interesting and I look forward to hearing from you about the highlights.

    Having recently ventured into teaching online, if there are any insights or advice you can provide about best practice in this area or new resources available, I would be very grateful.

    Matt Thompson

    1. Welcome to the online environment, Matt! Some things are the same, but other things take getting used to. I’m sure you’re discovering this already. Kenneth Beare has addressed online teaching on About.com. You might enjoy hearing his thoughts and advice.
      http://esl.about.com/od/teachingenglish/a/teach_online.htm

      I agree with Ken that two challenges are technology and business know-how. The trickiest part, in my opinion, is figuring out which platforms are best for you. If you’d like to discuss specifics, why don’t you join my community forum? Feel free to ask questions or start a discussion on the whole experience of teaching online. (Choose the ELT category.)
      http://www.englishwithjennifer.com/forum/

      1. Thank you for the link to Kenneth’s advice on the subject, it was very helpful. I’ve joined your community forum so I look forward to discussing online teaching in more detail there.

        Enjoy the convention and thanks again for your help.

        Matt

  2. Murali Nair says:

    Thank you and all the best. Eagerly waiting for your future lessons and feed backs.

  3. nliakos says:

    Looking for you at TESOL but so far no sightings! Maybe today at the MWIS booth.
    Nina

    1. Hi Nina! I’m sorry to have limited my first sighting of you to a wave! You were in the midst of a presentation, though. I will try to stop back at the ever-so-exciting EV, and perhaps I’ll catch an actual moment to chat with you!

  4. eduardo says:

    hi! jennifer
    in one of your videos you said that a flap T occurs between two vowel sounds if the vowel sound after T is unstressed

    but I’ve heard that the particle TO is often pronounced like a /d/ or flap t after a vowel sound example:
    it’s difficult for me to do. there is a vowel sound before the particle To. therefore, T turns into a flap t.
    am I ok ?

    1. Yes, Eduardo. If you pronounce that last phrase as a thought group (i.e., as one unit and with connected speech), then the stress is on ME and DO, right? FOR and TO are unstressed. Spoken at a fast rate, many American speakers would use a flap T in “to.”

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