When and How to Reduce Adjective Clauses

I’ve finally addressed adjective phrases in my series on adjective clauses. This latest lesson is by far the longest one in the playlist. I felt strongly about teaching not simply how to reduce an adjective clause, but when it makes sense to. I packed in a good amount of illustration and and practice.

The theme of my lesson is mainly one’s priorities at work, which might include money, passion, growth, and purpose. I featured one of my brothers, who played professional hockey out of his love for the game and the chance to push himself to his limits. If you’d like to practice this grammar point while exploring your students’ thoughts on the rewards one gets from work, please check out my Reducing Adjective Clauses_handout.

Photo credit: Question Mark, Pile, Question Mark by qimono. Retrieved from the Public Domain at https://pixabay.com/en/question-mark-pile-question-mark-2492009/.

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. Carly says:

    I like your blog! I have my own poetry blog but I also love studying the rules of English for fun. 😂 I am not a teacher but I like your site and hope to learn a few things or two. Do you have a specific post on writing more complex longer sentences?

    1. Hi Carly. Thanks for stopping by. I have videos on sentence structure. These may have information that’s relevant:
      https://www.englishwithjennifer.com/students/improve-your-writing-2/

      I expose my viewers to different sentence types in this series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3RehCAtc638&list=PLfQSN9FlyB6RumUTLuDAGY3m6YpBLHSsw
      I also have videos that you can find if you do a search on adjectives clauses, reduced adverb clauses, conditionals, and embedded questions.
      Best regards!

      1. Carly says:

        Thank you. I’ll be sure to check these out.

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