3 Things I Learned from Students

Interacting with students is both rewarding and stimulating. I receive frequent reminders that there’s more for me to learn about the English language. Here’s what students have taught me over the years: 1. Their eyes and ears  work for me as well. Students are very observant, and they are likely to repeat the language they hear…

A Getting-to-Know-You Activity to Practice Gerunds and Infinitives

Mastering combinations with gerunds and infinitives comes with practice. Here’s a straightforward activity for upper level students: gerunds-and-infinitives_handout.  A sorting task quickly moves into a production task that prompts writing and speaking. Students can learn more about one another by sharing their answers. Enjoy! Here are some related activities I shared in years past: Story…

The Whys and Wherefores: Using the Relative Pronouns WHY, WHERE, WHEN

As follow-up to my discussion about wh- clauses looking like relative clauses, I’ve decided to create a handout that targets combinations of head nouns with why, where, and when. If you have upper level students who’d benefit from practice with these relative pronouns, please check out my whys-and-wherefores_handout. After a quick sorting task, students are encouraged to create…

Getting a Firmer Handle on Word Order

In an effort to help an advanced student avoid awkward wording, I’ve been reviewing standard word order in our lessons. Some rules have been easy to state and reinforce, like putting the subject before the verb in statements and embedded questions. Other patterns are easier to recall only in the process of correcting a student’s writing. If…

A Clue as to Why Wh- Clauses Are So Tricky

Here’s the thing. Wh- clauses can be complements in noun phrases, and in this position they can look quite a lot like identifying adjective clauses with the relative pronouns where, when, and why. …Is that too much terminology in one sentence? Did you follow my line of thinking? Well, that’s part of the problem. We…

When Differences in Aspect Aren’t So Simple

It’s usually easy to explain why we need a verb in a certain time frame: We use the past tense for past actions (I studied law) and the present tense for present actions (I study law). A future time frame allows for more choices, but with sufficient practice students pick up on how to use…

Learning the Different Times of the Day

This week I decided to exploit more of my personal photos from a trip I took to Las Vegas. I was inspired to create materials to practice time words, specifically words we use to talk about time periods within a day. I created images similar to the one you see below. I never realized how…

3 Tips for Writing Online Instructional Posts

Happy New Year to one and all! It’s 2017. How will this year be significant for you? Each year serves a marker in some way. For some, 2017 will be their first year of teaching. For others, it may their twenty-fifth year in the field. As for me, 2017 will mark my tenth year teaching…

Holiday Wishes 2016

Thank you for visiting my ELT blog this past year. I hope you’ll allow me to continue sharing my reflections and teaching tips in 2017! As I’ll be traveling over the holidays, I won’t be posting until the first week of January. I hope you all enjoy the final days of 2016. May 2017 bring you much…

Flashback and Flashforward: Using Sequence Words

My latest YT video presents sequence words and other useful phrases for describing a process. Intermediate students could either write down the steps for some of the processes shown (how to make hot chocolate, how to wrap a present, etc.) prior to watching or after watching the video. The former would be a matter of…

Building Writing Skills

On a daily basis, I engage in more written correspondence than I do spoken exchanges. It’s the nature of my teaching. I provide more asynchronous instruction than synchronous. This is probably one reason why writing skills are a big focus in my work. Even the students I meet for live instruction usually submit written assignments between…

Teaching Intonation: Rising to the Challenge

Like many of you, I’ve begun to give some thought to 2017. I’d like to continue my practice of starting each new year with a special video challenge on YouTube. A 20-day Fast Speech Challenge marked the start of 2016. I kicked off 2015 with a similar 20-day Phrasal Verb Challenge. Presently, I’m toying with the idea of…